Monday, March 6, 2017

Delano Athletics Baseball - The Early Years

Delano Athletics Baseball - The Early Years

Adam Jaunich is an experienced sales professional and technology advisor who has a passion for playing and coaching baseball in his free time. A member of the Delano Athletic Club, Adam Jaunich is involved in a campaign to preserve the municipal baseball park in his hometown of Delano. One of the oldest ballparks in Minnesota, Delano Municipal Stadium has been a community staple for over 100 years. Referred to as the "Terrors of the '90s," the Delano Millers were one of the first teams to call the field home late in the 19th century. The team played sparingly as travel was difficult, but by 1923, the Millers joined the Old Wright County League, which was sponsored by the American Legion. After multiple state championship appearances in the 1930s, the Millers changed its name to the Delano Colts and enjoyed similar success in the following decade, finishing as state runners-up in 1941 and 1942. Created in 1948, the Delano Athletic Club immediately became the team's official sponsor. The club was instrumental in making Delano Municipal Stadium one of the first ball parks in the state to use lights. Since 1948, the team has been known as the Delano Athletics, colloquially the Delano A’s, and has played in the North Star League. The team has hosted four state tournaments at the ballpark, with the most recent occurring in 2013.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Four Essentials of a Marathon Training Regimen

Training for a 26-mile marathon requires dedication, preparation, and perseverance. Starting too hard and too fast often leads to preventable injuries. First-time runners should build up a consistent base run mileage for at least a year before they begin their marathon training regimen. Marathon training regimens generally last between 12 and 20 weeks. When runners are ready to begin marathon training, they should focus on four basic elements. 1. The Base Mileage. The aim of the training program is to gradually increase runs so that the runner ultimately is running 50 miles per week divided among three to five runs. The runs should be leisurely paced, and mileage should never increase by more than 10 percent each week. 2. The Weekly Long Run. Once every week or 10 days, runners should complete a long run, which should be increased from week to week. Long runs usually peak at about 20 miles, but the preparation gained through the training regimen makes the additional six miles readily achievable on race day. 3. Speed Work. Most training runs are done at a relaxed pace, but incorporating speed work into the training regimen helps improve aerobic capacity and ultimately makes running easier. Runners can include short sprints within slower-paced jogs or run longer, faster runs at a challenging but maintainable pace. 4. The Rest Routine. Just as runners schedule run sessions, they also must schedule rest and recovery sessions. On rest days, muscles recover from the workout. In the final weeks leading up to a marathon, runners should reduce the distance and difficulty of the training runs so that the body is well rested on race day.

Thursday, January 5, 2017

Tettegouche State Park - Cross Country Skiing

This past Saturday, New Years weekend, I left my downtown Minneapolis apartment early in the morning and ventured 3 1/2 hours north to Tettegouche State Park.

Upon my arrival with a fresh layer of snow, I gave cross country skiing a try for the first time this winter.

It was an excellent way to begin the New Year and a healthy mix of cross training for the Marathon that I will be running in Chattanooga, Tennessee in early March.

Happy New Year!